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Floods in southern England as half a month’s rain falls in just 12 hours

  • Downpours across the South East late last night and into this morning have left roads impassible
  • Commuters travelling into the capital were hit with cancellations of train services and delays on roads
  • The rain is now moving west, with Gloucestershire and South Wales facing a soaking this morning
  • Police are urging drivers to reduce their speed on the M4 after a jackknifed lorry caused long tailbacks 

By Richard Spillett for MailOnline

Published: 07:34 GMT, 11 May 2016 | Updated: 10:05 GMT, 11 May 2016

The Royal Windsor Horse show was cancelled today after torrential rain fell across the South East overnight, flooding some areas and causing chaos on roads.

The event - which was due to host one of the main celebrations for the Queen's Birthday - had to be called off after the deluge left much of its car park under water.

Nearly no area in the South East escaped a soaking as parts of the Home Counties saw half a month's worth of rain fall in just 12 hours. 

Parts of London have been shut down by flooding this morning and the Met Office has issued a yellow warning of up to 25mm rain for the whole of the south coast.

A statement on the Royal Windsor Horse Show's website stated: 'Organisers have announced that today's show is cancelled due to flooding in the public car park and lorry parks. The rain is expected to leave by lunchtime and tomorrow's events are planned to go ahead as usual.'

The Royal Windsor Horse Show, which was due to host one a celebration for the Queen's birthday, was cancelled today due to flooding

The Royal Windsor Horse Show, which was due to host one a celebration for the Queen's birthday, was cancelled today due to flooding

Disappointing fans trudge through water at the entrance of the hose show, whose organisers were hoping for a special day for the Queen today

Disappointing fans trudge through water at the entrance of the hose show, whose organisers were hoping for a special day for the Queen today

Fans put on a brave face as organisers said heavy rain had left the car park under water
Organisers said heavy rain had left the car park under water, leaving fans of equine sports unable to attend and see the day's events

Fans put on a brave face as organisers said heavy rain had left the car park under water, leaving equine sports lovers unable to attend

Some of the beautiful horses taken to the show in Berkshire were taken to exercise in the mud by their owners this morning

Some of the beautiful horses taken to the show in Berkshire were taken to exercise in the mud by their owners this morning

South Farnborough in Hampshire saw the worst of the weather - with 27mm of rain falling between 6pm last night and 6pm this morning. The area usually only sees an average of 54mm of rain in the entire month.

Heavy rain closed the A20 in Lewisham in the south-east of London as a section of the road was left under at least a foot of water. The district's station was also inaccessible.

Photos of the scene show a motorist stranded in his car as the flood rises around him and rescue workers work to pump away the deep water.

Transport for London warned drivers: 'Road is now impassable both ways by Lewisham roundabout. Not worth trying to drive through, don't be that guy!'

The heavy rain also brought trains into London to a standstill, with DLR services cancelled between Deptford Bridge and Lewisham.

Kew Gardens experiencing the wettest six-hour period, clocking nearly an inch of rain. Charlwood closely followed, with just under an inch falling on the Surrey village and more than 18mm of rain recorded in just one hour at St Catherine's Point on the Isle of Wight.

Steven Keates, from the Met Office, said across southern, central and western Britain it has been a 'pretty soaking night' with some 'intense downpours'.

'It is atrocious out there - driving will not be that pleasant on some roads across the South this morning,' he said.

The rain is expected to move west today, battering Gloucestershire, Somerset and South Wales, but should clear by the end of the week

The rain is expected to move west today, battering Gloucestershire, Somerset and South Wales, but should clear by the end of the week

This was the scene in Lewisham, south-east London early this morning after torrential rain left the road next to the area's train station flooded

This was the scene in Lewisham, south-east London early this morning after torrential rain left the road next to the area's train station flooded

The flooding caused the usually-busy A20 main road to be shut and train services between Lewisham and Deptford to be cancelled

The flooding caused the usually-busy A20 main road to be shut and train services between Lewisham and Deptford to be cancelled

A fireman surveys the scene beneath Lewisham railway bridge after heavy rain flooded the road and caused train services to be cancelled

A fireman surveys the scene beneath Lewisham railway bridge after heavy rain flooded the road and caused train services to be cancelled

Commuters in London had to walk to work in the rain as the wet conditions moved westwards during the morning
Commuters in Bristol had to walk to work in the rain as the wet conditions moved westwards during the morning

Commuters in London (left) and Bristol (right) had to walk to work in the rain as the wet conditions moved westwards during the morning

In Berkshire, there were long delays on the M4 after a jackknifed lorry blocked one carriageway and caused miles of tailbacks on the other. The AA tweeted:  'Accident on M4 - avoid Reading area.'

Police in nearby Newbury warned of dangerous conditions and slammed 'lunatic' drivers after a spate of aquaplane smashes on local roads.

A traffic officer said: 'Many drives are tearing along at upwards of 80mph when they can't see a thing because of the spray thrown up by other vehicles. Apart from being blinded by the sheets of spray, they are also likely to aquaplane on the pools of rainwater which are forming on the road surface.

'Their wheels will lose grip with the road and they will go into a spin - it's crazy the way some of them are tearing along, completely ignoring the conditions.' 

The rain is expected to clear in the South East today and move west, with Gloucestershire and Somerset expected to see the heaviest showers this morning and this afternoon. 

A jackknifed lorry was causing major disruption to rush hour traffic on the M4 motorway near Reading, Berkshire this morning

A jackknifed lorry was causing major disruption to rush hour traffic on the M4 motorway near Reading, Berkshire this morning

A picture taken by a stranded motorist shows emergency services dealing with the crash, which closed the busy motorway this morning

A picture taken by a stranded motorist shows emergency services dealing with the crash, which closed the busy motorway this morning

A traffic map tweeted by the AA shows the resulting disruption caused to the roads around Reading as police dealt with the crash

A traffic map tweeted by the AA shows the resulting disruption caused to the roads around Reading as police dealt with the crash

Forecaster Mr Keates added: 'This wet weather will gradually work its way south and west over the course of this morning and into the afternoon.

'The likes of Devon, Cornwall and South Wales will see some heavy rain over the next few hours, with an improving picture across London and the South East.

'But there is scope for some heavy thundery showers around this afternoon. There will be some sunshine around and temperatures will be in the high teens giving it a humid feel.'

Mr Keates said the weather in the South is in 'stark contrast' to warm and sunny weather over western Scotland and northern England.

Looking ahead to the rest of the week he said there is an 'improving picture' across the country and the potential for some showers in the south-west of England.

Temperatures could reach the low 20s on Thursday with these dropping by the weekend to the seasonal average of the mid to low teens.

Horse riders in the sea mist at Keyhaven Marshes, Hampshire as wet weather and flooding affect the whole of the south of England

Horse riders in the sea mist at Keyhaven Marshes, Hampshire as wet weather and flooding affect the whole of the south of England

Met Office maps from 3am last night show up to 16mm of rain falling an hour in parts of London with a band of rain across the Home Counties

Met Office maps from 3am last night show up to 16mm of rain falling an hour in parts of London with a band of rain across the Home Counties

A rain map from this morning shows the wet weather has now moved west, with Gloucestershire coming in for some of the heaviest showers

A rain map from this morning shows the wet weather has now moved west, with Gloucestershire coming in for some of the heaviest showers

The Met Office has issued a yellow warning for rain across the entire south coast and parts of South Wales for today

The Met Office has issued a yellow warning for rain across the entire south coast and parts of South Wales for today

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Allied blitz against ISIS kills 25,000 terrorists in Iraq and Syria as British bombing helps cut the group back to its weakest level in two years 

  • Defence Secretary Michael Fallon briefed the Cabinet on the latest today
  • Ministers were told 600 ISIS fighters had been killed in the last month alone
  • Britain is the second biggest contributor to the bombing campaign after US
  • ISIS now at its weakest position in two years, according to Downing Street
  •  For more of the latest Islamic State news visit www.dailymail.co.uk/isis

By Tim Sculthorpe, Mailonline Deputy Political Editor

Published: 14:45 GMT, 3 May 2016 | Updated: 17:17 GMT, 3 May 2016

ISIS has been reduced to its weakest level in two years under a sustained blitz from British and coalition bombing, No 10 said today.

Some 600 fighters have been killed in the past month - bringing the total number of terrorists killed to 25,000 since the campaign began. 

Britain is the second biggest contributor to the allied air campaign after the United States, No 10 said today. 

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon briefed the Cabinet on the latest action against ISIS, referred to by the Government as Daesh, earlier today. 

The Ministry of Defence has released regular updates on its bombing strikes in Iraq and Syria, including pictures and video of British planes destroying targets 

The Ministry of Defence has released regular updates on its bombing strikes in Iraq and Syria, including pictures and video of British planes destroying targets 

In the latest attacks, British planes were in action over northern Iraq, dropping Paveway bombs on a Daesh compound and silencing an enemy sniper 

In the latest attacks, British planes were in action over northern Iraq, dropping Paveway bombs on a Daesh compound and silencing an enemy sniper 

Mr Fallon's briefing came ahead of a conference later this week of countries contributing to the military effort against ISIS.

He also discussed measures being undertaken to prevent IS establishing footholds in other areas, particularly north Africa.

The Prime Minister's Official Spokeswoman: 'We have now seen more than 25,000 Daesh fighters killed, over 600 in the last month or so.

'The number of Daesh fighters is estimated to be at its lowest for about two years.

'We are playing a vital role in terms of the coalition air strikes - we are the second largest contributor behind the US.

'We have seen the Iraqi forces managing to clear Daesh out of the town of Hit in recent weeks and working with Kurdish and other partners liberating key areas of Syria and also managing to cut off the main route between Raqqa and Mosul.' 

In the most recent announcement of specific action, the Ministry of Defence said British planes had been in repeated action in mid-April.

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon said 25,000 ISIS fighters had been killed since the campaign began, including 600 in the past month  (file picture)

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon said 25,000 ISIS fighters had been killed since the campaign began, including 600 in the past month  (file picture)

They said: 'In western Iraq, Typhoons continued to support Iraqi ground forces north of Fallujah, where they conducted four Paveway attacks against snipers, a bunker and an entrenched fighting position.

'Tornados patrolled south-west of Kirkuk, where two Paveways destroyed a bridge built by Daesh across a canal, and a communications post nearby.

'Typhoons were again in action near Fallujah on Sunday 24 April - one pair silenced a sniper position that was firing on Iraqi troops, while a second pair dropped three Paveways on a Daesh compound.' 

IS has suffered major setbacks over the past months in Syria at the hands of government forces and US-backed Kurdish fighters including the loss of the historic city of Palmyra.

The self-declared caliphate has also suffered financially from coalition strikes on the oil facilities which provide much of its income and has lost territory in Iraq to the forces of the Baghdad government.

British jets, including RAF Tornadoes (file picture) have led the way in the allied campaign against ISIS in Syria and Iraq 

British jets, including RAF Tornadoes (file picture) have led the way in the allied campaign against ISIS in Syria and Iraq 

 

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US tourist reveals New Zealand Airbnb host stole her husband

  • American woman and husband booked Airbnb in Auckland, New Zealand
  • Husband eventually began a relationship with the Airbnb host
  • The couple, married for 30 years, are now getting divorced as a result
  • Wife calls it a 'twisted form of internet dating' and is warning others

By Leith Huffadine For Daily Mail Australia

Published: 11:51 GMT, 1 May 2016 | Updated: 14:25 GMT, 1 May 2016

A woman has detailed how she lost her husband to their Airbnb host as a 'twisted form of internet dating'.

The American woman, who wished to remain anonymous, said her 30-year marriage had ended after booking a stay with a woman through the online accommodation provider in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2015.

After their stay with an 'unusually solicitous and intrusive' host, the woman returned home, but her husband, who had also arrived a few days earlier than she, stayed on for a week, the New Zealand Herald reported.

The couple had booked an Airbnb in Auckland, New Zealand (pictured), where the husband met the female host he would later have an affair with (stock image)

The couple had booked an Airbnb in Auckland, New Zealand (pictured), where the husband met the female host he would later have an affair with (stock image)

A map shows Airbnb listings in the New Zealand city of Auckland, where the couple, now getting divorced, stayed in 2015

A map shows Airbnb listings in the New Zealand city of Auckland, where the couple, now getting divorced, stayed in 2015

The woman, who wished to remain anonymous, described the situation as a 'twisted form of internet dating' (stock image)

The woman, who wished to remain anonymous, described the situation as a 'twisted form of internet dating' (stock image)

Despite initially thinking their host was 'sad and needy', it seems her husband then got to know her much more personally.

Now, the woman and her husband are getting divorced, while he remains in a relationship with the host.

She described the affair as a 'shock', adding: 'I thought our marriage was imperfect but solid'.

The woman described the host now in a relationship with her husband as a single, middle-aged woman who 'calling periodically to ask if everything was all right and even asking to come by to make sure that the cleaning ladies were doing a good job'.

During their stay, she said her husband told her the host had 'gratuitously' told him personal details and revealed past relationships.

She believes her story not an uncommon one, but hopes it will be a warning for those using Airbnb.

Unsurprisingly, she doubted she'd be using the accommodation service again.

The couple, who have been married for 30 years, are now getting divorced as a result (stock image)

The couple, who have been married for 30 years, are now getting divorced as a result (stock image)

The woman has opened up about her story so it can be a warning to others using the online accommodation service (stock image)

The woman has opened up about her story so it can be a warning to others using the online accommodation service (stock image)

Unsurprisingly, the woman said it was unlikely she'd be using Airbnb again (stock image)

Unsurprisingly, the woman said it was unlikely she'd be using Airbnb again (stock image)

 

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Colorado woman Dynel Lance JAILED for 100 years for cutting baby from Michelle Wilkins’ womb

  • Dynel Lane, 36, used a kitchen knife to cut an eight-month-old fetus out of Michelle Wilkins's womb in a 2015 attack 
  • She was convicted of the crime in February and on Friday she was sentenced to 100 years in prison by a Colorado judge
  • Judge Maria Berkenkotter wanted Lane to show remorse but the woman refused to speak at the February conviction or sentencing phase 
  • Lane was sentenced to 48 years for attempted murder, 32 years for unlawful termination of a pregnancy and the remainder was for assault 
  • Lane faked her own pregnancy for months before attacking Wilkins

By Associated Press and Dailymail.com Reporter

Published: 22:55 GMT, 29 April 2016 | Updated: 14:52 GMT, 30 April 2016

A Colorado woman who cut a baby from a stranger's womb has been sentenced to 100 years in prison. 

Judge Maria Berkenkotter said the harshest sentences for the most serious charges were justified by the brutality of the 2015 attack, described as performing a cesarean with a kitchen knife. 

Berkenkotter also said the victim, Michelle Wilkins, as well as her family and the community needed Dynel Lane, 36, to express remorse.

Lane murmured a 'no' when the judge asked if she wanted to speak. 

Dynel Lane (pictured),  36, was convicted in February of attempting to kill a fetus. She appeared during sentencing at the Boulder County Justice Center in Boulder, Colorado, on Friday.

Dynel Lane (pictured),  36, was convicted in February of attempting to kill a fetus. She appeared during sentencing at the Boulder County Justice Center in Boulder, Colorado, on Friday.

Lane cut an eight-month old fetus out of the stomach of  Michelle Wilkins after the 36-year-old lured the pregnant woman to her home

Lane cut an eight-month old fetus out of the stomach of  Michelle Wilkins after the 36-year-old lured the pregnant woman to her home

Lane also did not speak in her defense during her trial, which ended in February when jurors found her guilty of attempting to kill Wilkins after luring her victim to her home with an ad for maternity clothes.

Jurors had heard that Lane went to elaborate lengths to feign her own pregnancy before attacking Wilkins.

They did not hear that in 2002, Lane's 19-month-old son drowned in what investigators ruled was an accident. 

Relatives who spoke on Lane's behalf before the sentencing Friday said her remorse over losing her son may have led her to take an action they could not understand or explain.

Lane wept as she was sentenced to 100 years in prison by a judge who said she showed not enough to no remorse

Lane wept as she was sentenced to 100 years in prison by a judge who said she showed not enough to no remorse

Wilkins (from left) stands with her sister Sarah, their father Mark and mother Wendy, as Wilkins speaks with members of the media following the sentencing hearing for Lane

Wilkins (from left) stands with her sister Sarah, their father Mark and mother Wendy, as Wilkins speaks with members of the media following the sentencing hearing for Lane

District Judge Maria Berkenkotter told Lane the victim and the courtroom was 'hungry' to hear her speak 

District Judge Maria Berkenkotter told Lane the victim and the courtroom was 'hungry' to hear her speak 

Lane's attorneys did not dispute that she attacked Wilkins, but they argued there was no evidence it was a calculated murder attempt. 

They urged jurors to convict Lane of the lesser charge of attempted manslaughter.

Berkenkotter sentenced Lane to 48 years for attempted murder and 32 years for unlawful termination of a pregnancy. 

The remainder of her sentence was for assault charges in the attack. 

She was given credit for the more than a year she has served since her arrest.

Kathryn Herold, the public defender representing Lane, told the judge Friday she would appeal and that Lane had the right not to speak. 

Berkenkotter acknowledged that was Lane's constitutional right. 

But the judge said that in weighing her sentence she had to take into account that 'people are hungry to hear from you, Miss Lane. Hungry, desperate to hear you express genuine remorse from the bottom of your heart'.

Prosecutors said they were unable to charge Lane with murdering Wilkins' unborn girl because a coroner found no evidence the fetus lived outside the womb. 

Lane murmured a 'no' when the judge asked if she wanted to speak. Lane lost an 18-month-old baby in a drowning accident in 2002

Lane murmured a 'no' when the judge asked if she wanted to speak. Lane lost an 18-month-old baby in a drowning accident in 2002

 Prosecutors said they were unable to charge Lane with murdering Wilkins' unborn girl because a coroner found no evidence the fetus lived outside the womb

Prosecutors said they were unable to charge Lane with murdering Wilkins' unborn girl because a coroner found no evidence the fetus lived outside the womb 

That led Colorado Republicans to introduce legislation that would have allowed a murder charge. Democrats rejected the measure, the third time such a proposal failed in Colorado. 

Over the objection of abortion-rights supporters, 38 states have made a fetus' killing a homicide.

Wilkins focused on her unborn daughter Friday. 

She placed a large photograph of her dead baby, who appeared to be sleeping, on an easel next to the witness stand, then asked Berkenkotter to impose the harshest possible sentence.

Wilkins said after the sentencing that she saw the hearing as a day in court for her daughter, who she named Aurora.

'Judge Berkenkotter was clearly listening to everything that we were saying,' Wilkins told reporters, adding she felt justice had been served.

In court, Wilkins had directed her words to Lane, who sat straight and showed no emotion as her victim spoke. 

Lane cried later in the hearing when a letter from one of her two daughters expressing love was read.

Lane's mother apologized in court to Wilkins and her family, as did her father in a letter his wife read.

Jurors had heard that Lane went to elaborate lengths to feign her own pregnancy before attacking Wilkins

Jurors had heard that Lane went to elaborate lengths to feign her own pregnancy before attacking Wilkins

Lane had posted online photos of herself with a distended belly and sent the man she said was the father of her child ultrasound images downloaded from the Internet. 

David Ridley, who lived with Lane and her two daughters, testified at trial that Lane claimed for more than a year that she was expecting a boy, whom they planned to name James. 

Friends even threw a baby shower.

Ridley had grown suspicious by the time Lane lured Wilkins to her Longmont home. 

Wilkins testified they chatted for about an hour before Lane hit, pushed and tried to choke her, then used two kitchen knives to cut the baby from her womb.

When Ridley came home early from work that day to meet Lane for a doctor's appointment, he said he found the fetus in a bathtub and drove the child and Lane to a hospital, where she begged staff to save her baby.

Lane said nothing to Ridley about Wilkins, who was unconscious at her home. Wilkins regained consciousness and called police.

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Lancashire teacher Andrew Wilson JAILED after grooming and seducing student Hayley McGregor

  • Father-of-two Andrew Willson, 48, was jailed for 20 months in February
  • He pleaded guilty to five historic offences of indecent assault 
  • Assault carried out against schoolgirl Hayley McGregor, now 35
  • First assault occurred in Willson's office at Lancashire school in mid 90s
  • Now Hayley bravely says: 'I will not be a silent victim any more'

By Helen Weathers for the Daily Mail

Published: 23:00 GMT, 29 April 2016 | Updated: 08:58 GMT, 30 April 2016

Hayley McGregor will never forget the day Andrew Willson joined her school. She was 12 years old and the Year 8 girls couldn't stop talking about him.

'Seen the new drama teacher?' they whispered. 'He's really fit.'

Aged 25, Mr Willson was classic schoolgirl crush material. Good-looking and charismatic, he had worked as an actor and, more glamorous still, played in a rock band.

Hayley McGregor, now 35, will never forget the day Andrew Willson joined her school. She was 12 years old and the Year 8 girls couldn’t stop talking about him

Hayley McGregor, now 35, will never forget the day Andrew Willson joined her school. She was 12 years old and the Year 8 girls couldn't stop talking about him

'The girls fancied him and the lads all thought he was cool,' remembers Hayley, now 35. 'He even dropped the odd swear word. We were in complete awe of him.'

But it was Hayley, a petite student with blonde hair and a bubbly personality, whom Willson singled out for special attention.

Casting her as his leading lady in three school productions, he told everyone she had star quality and was destined for great things.

At parent-teacher meetings, he sang Hayley's praises and offered to find her a showbusiness agent.

Hayley's parents thought the married teacher, who had a young son with severe learning difficulties, not only inspirational but so trustworthy he became a family friend.

This impression was cemented when Willson refused to let Hayley — cast as bad girl Rizzo in the school production of the musical Grease — kiss her co-star, saying it was 'inappropriate' for a girl of 14.

In February, Willson, 48, was jailed for 20 months after he pleaded guilty to five historic offences of indecent assault against Hayley

In February, Willson, 48, was jailed for 20 months after he pleaded guilty to five historic offences of indecent assault against Hayley

As they listened to their daughter singing Rizzo's ballad There Are Worse Things I Could Do, they had no idea that Willson was already saving Hayley's kisses — and more besides — for himself in a gross abuse of trust.

But it would be almost 20 years before Hayley, after suffering a complete breakdown, could find the courage to tell her parents what he had done and, with their support, go to the police.

In February, Willson, 48, was jailed for 20 months after he pleaded guilty to five historic offences of indecent assault against Hayley when she was a schoolgirl aged 14 or 15, his grooming having started when she was only 12.

The court heard that his first indecent assault occurred in his office at Fearns High School, a mixed comprehensive in Bacup, Lancashire, in the mid-Nineties, when he kissed the youngster and rubbed her over her clothing.

He admitted later kissing her in his car while giving her a lift home from rehearsals, and twice involved her in carrying out a sex act on him.

Prosecutors said Willson even had the youngster pulled out of a science lesson so they could enjoy a romp at a friend's house, smearing Nutella chocolate spread over her naked body and licking it off.

Defending Willson, Philip Holden said the father of two, whose marriage has broken down and who has lost his job as a result of the charges, 'accepts full responsibility' and 'does not seek to blame the victim'. He told the court he felt 'ashamed'.

Speaking after the case, Detective Constable Mick Smith, of Lancashire police, praised Hayley's 'enormous courage' in coming forward and said: 'Willson abused his position of trust and groomed his victim before taking advantage of her.'

Actress and drama teacher Hayley was not present in court to see her former teacher sentenced.

Three years ago she was diagnosed with depression, social anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder — all linked, she says, to the emotional scars left by Willson.

Now, in her first interview since Willson was sentenced, Hayley has agreed to waive her right to anonymity to encourage other victims of historic sex crimes to come forward.

The court heard that his first indecent assault occurred in his office at Fearns High School, a mixed comprehensive in Bacup, Lancashire, in the mid-Nineties, when he kissed the youngster (pictured here age 14) and rubbed her over her clothing

The court heard that his first indecent assault occurred in his office at Fearns High School, a mixed comprehensive in Bacup, Lancashire, in the mid-Nineties, when he kissed the youngster (pictured here age 14) and rubbed her over her clothing

After years of harbouring a secret so corrosive it almost destroyed her, she is determined to speak openly without shame or embarrassment as part of her recovery.

'Telling the police was never about ruining his life or hurting his family. I just wanted him to admit what he'd done to me was wrong and acknowledge the harm he'd done,' says Hayley, who lives in Greater Manchester with her partner Leroy, 45, an actor.

'He was still working as a teacher and I'd started to worry, "What if I wasn't the only one?" I'd spent years feeling guilty over what I thought was a love affair with a married man when it was nothing of the sort.

'I don't think he ever loved me. He manipulated me by making me feel special, hoodwinked me into giving him what he wanted, then duped me into thinking I was to blame. He told me we'd both be in trouble if I ever told.'

Hayley says that, at 12, she was a 'good girl' who was close to her father, a fireman, and mother, a teaching assistant, as well as her baby brother, ten years her junior.

A sporty child, she had never had any attention from boys except for immature jokes about her 'treetrunk legs', and spent all her free time studying or attending ballet, tap and modern dance classes.

'I had a big crush on Mr Willson and went all doe-eyed when I saw him. He was always saying nice things about my blonde hair and blue eyes,' says Hayley, whose talent made her the natural choice for starring roles.

Hayley says that, at 12, she was a 'good girl' who was close to her father, a fireman, and mother, a teaching assistant, as well as her baby brother, ten years her junior. Pictured: Fearns School in Bacup, Lancashire

Hayley says that, at 12, she was a 'good girl' who was close to her father, a fireman, and mother, a teaching assistant, as well as her baby brother, ten years her junior. Pictured: Fearns School in Bacup, Lancashire

Tactile and warm, Hayley liked it when Willson gave her a hug after a show, or gently rubbed her arm, or put his hands on her waist to move her out of the way during rehearsals — feeling 'butterflies' in her stomach.

No one thought anything of it when the pupils changed into their costumes before a performance in Willson's office, often while he was present.

Willson had bonded with Hayley's father over their shared love of Leeds United football club: the pair would go to matches together and enjoy a pint afterwards. He was always on the phone, using the friendship as an excuse to speak to Hayley.

So when Willson offered to give Hayley a lift home after rehearsals, to save her catching the bus late, her parents happily agreed, thinking she would be safe.

At first they would just talk, but as they grew closer Willson would start to take detours, parking in quiet country lanes to unburden his feelings.

Willson pictured after his appearance at Burnley Magistrates Court

Willson pictured after his appearance at Burnley Magistrates Court

'He would reminisce about the first time he saw me, queueing up for his drama class. He told me, "I just saw these beautiful blonde locks, these blue eyes and amazing smile and I thought, 'Oh dear, I'm in trouble."

'He used to talk about his wife, saying he'd married too young but he couldn't leave her because their child had special needs. He said they didn't get on any more, didn't have fun — all the cliches — and that he'd met his soulmate in me.

'It felt wonderful to hear. At that age I still watched Disney films and thought I was in some romantic fairy tale which would have the most amazing happy ending.'

Hayley says it was at the end of Year 8, just after a rehearsal for a school production of the musical Blood Brothers, that Willson declared: 'I'm falling for you and I don't know what to do about it.'

She says: 'He made the first move to kiss me, I would never have had the confidence to do that. Never. I didn't even call him by his first name. I always called him Mr Willson.'

By Year 9, Hayley says she'd fallen for her teacher and was infatuated. He told her he wouldn't have sex with her until she was 16 because she was underage, but promised to leave his wife for her then.

But that didn't stop him from taking advantage of Hayley's innocence. 'I never felt I could say, "I don't want to do that." I feel angry about it now, but I just wanted to make him happy. It was never about me, it was always about what I could do for him,' she says.

'Everything I knew sexually, he'd taught me. I think it was my innocence he liked, the fact I'd never done anything with anyone else before. He was always going on about how wonderful my young body was.

'He used to say to me, "I chose you — aren't you lucky that I chose you?" but I wasn't lucky at all.'

After Hayley's performance in Grease at the end of Year 9, she was devastated to learn from her father that Willson was leaving the school to move with his wife and son to Northampton, where he planned to work as a supply teacher.

He used to say to me, "I chose you — aren't you lucky that I chose you?" but I wasn't lucky at all 
Hayley McGregor

'I was heartbroken and cried so much my eyes were swollen shut. When I spoke to him, he promised he'd stay in touch and that I could go stay with him when he did acting gigs in Manchester,' says Hayley.

They agreed to meet one last time before he left. Hayley bunked off school and Willson took her to a male friend's empty house, where he took her clothes off and covered her with Nutella.

'It was his idea. All I wanted to do was snuggle and kiss, but I pretended to like it to please him. I was mortified,' says Hayley, who was 14 at the time. 'Afterwards he didn't even take me home, he dropped me in a country lane, so I could walk to the school bus.

'Soon after he moved to Northampton, I found out from my parents that his wife was pregnant and I realised the whole love story he'd sold me couldn't have been true. I cried and cried but couldn't tell anyone. I thought people would blame me for trying to break up a marriage.'

Willson remained friends with Hayley's parents and the next year, when she was 15, the family went to stay with him and his wife in Northampton on the way home from a Leeds match at Wembley.

'The secret was eating away at me. It created a gulf between me and my parents because they were still friends with him and I couldn't bear to see the hurt on their faces if I told them the truth, so I distanced myself from them' said Hayley. Willson is pictured after his court appearance

'The secret was eating away at me. It created a gulf between me and my parents because they were still friends with him and I couldn't bear to see the hurt on their faces if I told them the truth, so I distanced myself from them' said Hayley. Willson is pictured after his court appearance

While her parents slept upstairs and after his wife had left for work, Willson crept into the lounge where Hayley was sleeping on a sofa-bed, and early that morning they had sex. It was far from the fairytale ending Hayley had hoped for.

She says: 'I was still in love with him. I still thought he was my soulmate, but when I was 16 I told him I never wanted to see him again,' she says. 'I knew if I did, I'd end up hating myself even more.'

Hayley vowed to put the whole business behind her and planned to take their secret 'to her grave'.

She managed to pass her GCSEs with flying colours and went to college to do A-levels in drama, English and dance, obtaining two A grades and a B.

At 19, she spent a year in Italy with a performance troupe, teaching English through theatre, and on her return landed a job with the entertainment team at Longleat Safari Park. But she says all her relationships after Andrew Willson were disastrous.

'On the surface I could appear bright and bubbly, but all my adult life I have suffered from extremely low self-esteem because he broke it,' she says.

On the surface I could appear bright and bubbly, but all my adult life I have suffered from extremely low self-esteem because he broke it 
Hayley McGregor

'The secret was eating away at me. It created a gulf between me and my parents because they were still friends with him and I couldn't bear to see the hurt on their faces if I told them the truth, so I distanced myself from them.

'It has taken years for the damage to fully show and at times I've felt so depressed I haven't wanted to live any more. I liken it to having a wound stitched up but the infection is still there. You can't heal until you unpick the stitches and clean out the nastiness.'

Two years ago, Hayley invited her parents, aged 56 and 55 and now retired, to her home. She read them a poem she had written, which included the words: 'I know I can't move on until I tell / Then, I only remain here / Under his manipulative spell / Under the control of a puppeteer.'

When she had finished, she told them: 'The man I am referring to is Andrew Willson.'

She says: 'At first there was stone cold silence, but I knew the minute it was out of my lips I was believed. They weren't angry with me, they didn't say, 'Why didn't you tell us?'

'They just started crying and hugged me, then my Dad said, 'Right, what do you want to do? Go to the police?' They both came with me to the police station and my Dad was there when I made my statement.

'They never doubted me for a second and they felt betrayed by someone they thought was a friend. They feel guilty they hadn't seen it at the time, but there really wasn't anything for them to see.

'I was happy and was flourishing because he'd made me believe I was special and that he loved me. The truth was, I was a young girl with a crush and he was my teacher. Instead of discouraging it, he took advantage of me.

'People teach you as a child about stranger danger, but nothing like this. And if I can help another person by speaking out, then I will not be a silent victim any more.'

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Mars images show the planet’s surface in 5 TIMES more detail than ever before 

  • Researchers have used a cutting edge technique to boost the resolution of images of the Martian surface 
  • Stacking existing images of the same area, taken from slightly different angles, they produced detailed composites
  • The improved resolution could enable scientists to capture 'rover-scale' images from satellites orbiting miles above
  • It is hoped that using the approach will improve our knowledge of planets surfaces using remote images

By Ryan O'Hare for MailOnline

Published: 05:00 GMT, 26 April 2016 | Updated: 19:44 GMT, 26 April 2016

At an average distance of 225 million km (139.8 million miles) from Earth, the sheer logistics involved in getting information back and forth from Mars make it a mammoth task.

But researchers have found a way to overcome these technical challenges, reworking a series of images beamed back from the red planet to making them up to five times more detailed - and have used them to spot the ill-fated Beagle 2 lander of the Martian surface.

This series of black and white images has been created using a groundbreaking new image stacking and matching technique that reveals patches of the planet’s surface in unprecedented detail, providing a ‘drone’s eye view’.

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The approach has shown that it is possible to use images from multiple passes in order to improve resolution of surface details, such as Beagle-2 lander (pictured as the bright area in the centre)
Despite the ground-breaking image techniques, the Beagle-2 lander is still is still pixelated owing to its small size

A close up of the images shows the Beagle 2 lander in more detail, but despite the ground-breaking image techniques, the craft is still is still pixelated owing to its small size - less than two metres, according to the image key - but the approach has shown that it is possible to use images from multiple passes in order to improve resolution of surface details

They show three sites on the planet’s surface in great detail, including the snaking tracks from Nasa’s Spirit rover and ancient lake beds discovered by the Curiosity rover – which is still exploring the surface.

In addition, the team from University College London has also refined the view of the Beagle 2 lander – the failed British lander from the early 2000’s which was missing in action until 2013.

Despite a successful landing on the surface in 2003, the Beagle 2 failed to deploy its solar panels and so communication went dead.

Due to the restricted resolution of the images, Beagle 2 is still heavily pixelated, but the images look to show some of the solar panels unfolded, while other panels remain folded, leaving the lander frozen in time.

Professor Jan-Peter Muller, a researcher from the UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory and co-author of the study, explained: ‘We now have the equivalent of drone-eye vision anywhere on the surface of Mars where there are enough clear repeat pictures.

WHAT IS THE BEAGLE 2? 

Beagle 2 was an unsuccessful British landing spacecraft that formed part of the European Space Agency's 2003 Mars Express mission.

It was conceived by a group of British academics headed by Professor Colin Pillinger at the Open University, in collaboration with the University of Leicester.

The probe's purpose was to search for signs of life on Mars, past or present.

A landing site on the red planet in Isidis Panitia - a basin - was chosen.

The Beagle 2 mission call-sign was composed by Blur and the 'test card' intended to calibrate its cameras and spectrometers was painted by Damien Hirst.

The Beagle 2 craft successfully deployed from its Mars Express 'mother ship'.

Confirmation should have come on Christmas Day 2003 but in the following days the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank failed to pick up a signal.

Attempts were made throughout January and February 2004 to contact the probe via Mars Express, but failed.

On December 20, 2005, Professor Pillinger released processed images from the Mars Global Surveyor suggesting that Beagle 2 came down in a crater at the landing site.

But in February 2007, another photo revealed the crater was empty.

However, in 2015, just eight months after the death of mission mastermind Professor Colin Pillinger, it was confirmed the craft did land on the red planet. 

‘It allows us to see objects in much sharper focus from orbit than ever before and the picture quality is comparable to that obtained from landers.

Professor Muller added: ‘As more pictures are collected, we will see increasing evidence of the kind we have only seen from the three successful rover missions to date.

‘This will be a game-changer and the start of a new era in planetary exploration.’

Researchers have used a cutting-edge image analysis technique to boost the resolution of the Martian surface by up to five times
The high definition black and white images were created by stacking multiple images of the same region of the surface, taken from slightly different angles, in order to reveal more detail in a composite image

Researchers have used a cutting-edge image analysis technique to boost the resolution of the Martian surface (pictured left) by up to five times. The black and white composites were created by stacking multiple images of the same region of the surface, taken from slightly different angles, in order to reveal more detail in a composite image (pictured right)

Using the approach, called super-resolution restoration, the team from University College London improved the resolution of images taken from satellites orbiting the red planet
The bright spot in the centre left of the higher resolution image (pictured right), above and to the right of a crater, is the Beagle-2 lander which went missing after losing contact in 2003

Needle in a haystack: Using the approach, called super-resolution restoration, the team from University College London improved the resolution of images taken from satellites orbiting the red planet (pictured left). The bright spot in the centre left of the higher resolution image (pictured right), above and to the right of a crater, is the Beagle 2 lander which went missing after losing contact in 2003

IMPROVING RESOLUTION

Researchers have used a cutting edge technique to boost the resolution of images of the Martian surface.

By stacking existing images of the same area, taken from slightly different angles, they were able to produce the detailed black and white composites.

Thanks to the technique, the improved resolution could enable scientists to capture 'rover-scale' images from satellites orbiting miles above.

The team says it hopes that the approach will improve our knowledge of planets surfaces using remote images.

Due to a range of factors, including the optics used in telescopes, the limited bandwidth for relaying data back to Earth and even interference from the planet’s atmosphere, cameras in orbit are limited to resolutions of approximately 25cm (10 inches).

By stacking and matching images taken of the same area from slightly different angles, however, the UCL team’s approach has managed to reduce this limit to just 5cm (2 inches).

Called super-resolution restoration, the approach means the team can use images collected by orbiting satellites on multiple passes of the same area of the surface and combine them to produce much higher definition images, giving the effect of flying much closer to the surface – like a drone.

For active planets like Earth, the technique isn’t suitable as features are likely to change between passes.

But for slower planetary time scales, such as that on Mars – where due to the lack of weather systems the surface can take millions of years to change ­– the approach could be used to combine images taken over a number of years.

In order to produce the composite images, the UCL team used stacks of four to eight images of the Martian surface snapped by Nasa’s HiRISE camera to get the close resolution.

‘Using novel machine vision methods, information from lower resolution images can be extracted to estimate the best possible true scene,’ explained Yu Tao, a research associate at UCL and lead author of the paper.

The tracks of Nasa's Spirit rover can just about be made out from the original image
But the process of stacking multiple images of the same area taken at slightly different angles can provide a much higher resolution composite image

The tracks of Nasa's Spirit rover can just about be made out from the original image (pictured left). But the process of stacking multiple images of the same area taken at slightly different angles can provide a much higher resolution composite image (pictured right)

In order to produce the composite images, the UCL team used stacks of four to eight images of the Martian surface snapped by Nasa’s HiRISE camera to get the close resolution
While the approach is ideal for planets whose surfaces don't  change frequently, it would not be ideal for more turbulent planets, such as Earth, where the surface is more likely to change

In order to produce the composite images, the UCL team used stacks of four to eight images of the Martian surface snapped by Nasa’s HiRISE camera to get the close resolution. They explain that while the approach is ideal for planets whose surfaces don't  change frequently, it would not be ideal for more turbulent planets, such as Earth, where the surface is more likely to change

‘This technique has huge potential to improve our knowledge of a planet’s surface from multiple remotely sensed images.

‘In the future, we will be able to recreate rover-scale images anywhere on the surface of Mars and other planets from repeat image stacks.’

The full findings have been published in the journal Planetary and Space Science. 

COLIN PILLINGER: THE SCIENTIST WHO NEVER GAVE UP HOPE

Professor Colin Pillinger first conceived the Beagle 2 project with his colleagues at Open University and Leicester University in 1997. The mission then absorbed six years of the charismatic scientist's as he attempted to raise funds and plan the mission.

Professor Colin Pillinger first conceived the Beagle 2 project with his colleagues at Open University and Leicester University in 1997. The mission then absorbed six years of the charismatic scientist's as he attempted to raise funds and plan the mission.

Professor Colin Pillinger first conceived the Beagle 2 project with his colleagues at Open University and Leicester University in 1997.

The mission then absorbed six years of the charismatic scientist's as he attempted to raise funds and plan the mission.

Even after its apparent failure to land in 2003, an event watched on Christmas Day around the world, Professor Pillinger continued his work to find the missing probe and on the many spin off projects that emerged.

Despite the failure to contact Beagle 2, he never considered the mission to be a failure, and instead a victory against bureaucracy.

The technology developed for the mission has also led to the development new medical devices and tools.

Following today's announcement, Prof Pillinger's daughter Shusanah said her father would have been pleased to 'defy' critics of the mission.

She said: 'This shows such an immense success and not forgetting all the other things that went on in the background of Beagle 2, all the promotion of science, all of the inspiration to children.

'He would love that this is in the news again. He would love that this could inspire that next generation to do Beagle 3.'

She added that her family had struggled since the death of her father in May last year.

Starting out as a chemist he worked at Cambridge and at Nasa, analysing samples of moon rock on the Apollo programme.

He became a professor in interplanetary science at the Open University in 1991, and earned a host of other qualifications during his distinguished career, along with numerous awards. He was made a CBE by the Queen in 2003.

In 2005 he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis but died in hospital last May from a brain hemorrhage.

She said: 'We are trying to carry on what dad would have wanted. He was someone who wanted science to be communicated to everybody. We want everybody to be aware of Beagle 2, to be inspired by it.

'But there is a tinge of sadness that he can't be here. You can see that in the room where all his colleagues, all the people he worked with, everybody is gutted he cannot be here.' 

It is hoped that using the approach will improve our knowledge of planets surfaces by remote images taken from orbiting satellites
The UCL team hopes the improved resolution could enable scientists to capture 'rover-scale' images from satellites orbiting miles above

It is hoped that using the approach will improve our knowledge of planets surfaces by remote images taken from orbiting satellites. The UCL team hopes the improved resolution could enable scientists to capture 'rover-scale' images from satellites orbiting miles above. Pictured are two version, original and SRR composite image, of a rock field on the Martian surface 

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Chelsea ‘super-homes’ in jeopardy as buyers must face tougher restrictions from planners

  • Nearly half of applications to combine homes in 2015 and 2016 rejected
  • Kensington and Chelsea council trying to buck the super-homes trend 
  • Said it causes failure to meet net housing unit target of 733 units per year
  • Monsoon boss knocked five adjacent houses into one huge home last year

By Ekin Karasin For Mailonline

Published: 11:51 GMT, 23 April 2016 | Updated: 13:07 GMT, 23 April 2016

Wealthy buyers wanting to create Chelsea superhomes by knocking through several houses or flats are facing much tougher restrictions from planners.

Almost half the applications to combine homes in 2015 and 2016 so far have been rejected by the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea - despite them approving the majority of applications before then.

The stricter line comes in the wake of a quadrupling of applications between 2010 and 2015, according to Huntly Hooper, a property consultancy firm.

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Wealthy buyers wanting to create Chelsea super-homes by knocking through several houses or flats are facing much tougher restrictions from planners (pictured Eldon Road in Chelsea)

Wealthy buyers wanting to create Chelsea super-homes by knocking through several houses or flats are facing much tougher restrictions from planners (pictured Eldon Road in Chelsea)

The council said the trend meant it was failing to meet targets for net housing units, which is currently at 733 units per year in the London Plan. 

One notable example for the super-homes trend is the founder of clothing chain Monsoon, Peter Simon, who knocked five adjacent houses in the borough into one huge home last year.

The works involved digging two basements underneath the 19th century properties and allegedly cost £1million.

This March James Hambro who wanted to connect his two multimillion-pound homes in Chelsea  with a large basement had his plans rejected

This March James Hambro who wanted to connect his two multimillion-pound homes in Chelsea with a large basement had his plans rejected

Almost half the applications to combine homes in 2016 and 2015 have been rejected by the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea (pictured, the exclusive Glebe Place in Chelsea)

Almost half the applications to combine homes in 2016 and 2015 have been rejected by the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea (pictured, the exclusive Glebe Place in Chelsea)

The mansion has a wine cellar, a gym, an underground swimming pool, a sauna and two self-contained flats that could be used by staff. 

And this March, Eton-educated banker James Hambro who wanted to connect his two multimillion-pound homes with a large basement was refused planning permission.

The 66-year-old had hoped to link his four-storey terraced house in Chelsea, West London, to a smaller mews property behind it, which his family also owns. 

The banker – who is chairman of wealth management firm James Hambro & Partners – has owned both the properties since 1977 and has no mortgage on either. 

Mr Hambro, 66, (pictured) had hoped to link his four-storey terraced house in Chelsea, West London, to a smaller mews property behind it

Mr Hambro, 66, (pictured) had hoped to link his four-storey terraced house in Chelsea, West London, to a smaller mews property behind it

The council wrote in a planning application appeal statement referring to the failure to reach housing targets: 'The further loss of residential units through amalgamations will have a significant impact on the borough’s ability to meet its housing delivery target and contribute to the significant and growing need for new houses.'

'We estimate we were losing around 100 a year through amalgamation and therefore the impact is significant,' a spokesman for Kensington and Chelsea told the Financial Times.

Oliver Hooper, director at Huntly Hooper, said buyers looking to combine homes were often 'looking for an opportunity to create value, whether it is being used as a home or purely as an investment, so that they can recompense the purchasing costs'. 

So-called 'super prime' homes get double the price per square foot than smaller 'prime' dwellings fetch, he said.

He added that stamp duty cost reforms in 2014 elevated the costs for homes bought at more than £937,500.

Second homes and buy-to-let properties now incur an additional charge of 3 per cent of the purchase price. Buyers often seek a profit of 20 per cent after costs, said Mr Hooper.

Mr Hooper said planners were more lenient on cases in which houses converted into flats were returned to their original form. 

They seem to think that is in the material interests of the building,' he said.

The council said the superhome trend meant it was failing to meet targets for net housing units, which is currently at 733 units per year in the London Plan (pictured Queen's Gate Place in South Kensington)

The council said the superhome trend meant it was failing to meet targets for net housing units, which is currently at 733 units per year in the London Plan (pictured Queen's Gate Place in South Kensington)

 

 

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Stay-at-home father ‘told 999 operator “my little girl has fallen down” in a lying call made two hours after he beat her to death in a fit of rage’

  • Ben Butler, 36, is accused of murdering his daughter Ellie, six, at home
  • Jury played 999 call where mother Jennie Gray screams for help
  • But the Old Bailey heard the girl had been dead for two hours before call 
  • Gray, 36, and Butler both deny child cruelty and he denies murder
  • The mother has already admitted perverting the course of justice 

By Joseph Curtis For Mailonline

Published: 11:02 GMT, 22 April 2016 | Updated: 12:29 GMT, 22 April 2016

A stay-at-home father made a harrowing 999 call telling the operator 'my little girl has fallen down' in a 'lying call' made two hours after he battered the six-year-old to death in a fit of rage, a court heard today.

Ellie Butler was found by medics with 'catastrophic head injuries' in her bedroom in October 2013.

Her parents, Ben Butler and Jennie Gray, both 36, called 999 two hours after she was fatally hurt while home alone with her father, the court has heard.

Gray can be heard screaming for help during the mostly-inaudible call while Butler tells the operator his daughter was injured after she 'fell down'. 

The prosecution at the Old Bailey in London claims a post-mortem examination ruled out an accidental fall and her death was put down to Butler either beating her over the head with a heavy object or throwing her against the floor or wall.

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Murder accused Ben Butler, centre, pictured with his alleged victim, daughter Ellie, right, and his partner Jennie Gray, left

Murder accused Ben Butler, centre, pictured with his alleged victim, daughter Ellie, right, and his partner Jennie Gray, left

Ellie pictured with her father, who told a 999 operator she had been hurt 'falling down' the Old Bailey heard
Gray, pictured at the Old Bailey, denies child cruelty

Ellie pictured with her father, who told a 999 operator she had been hurt 'falling down' the Old Bailey heard, while her mother, right, screamed for help down the phone

Butler, of Sutton, south-west London, denies Ellie's murder and along with Gray has pleaded not guilty to child cruelty over an earlier shoulder injury.

Graphic designer Gray has admitted perverting the course of justice by hiding or destroying evidence after rushing home from work to protect her partner. 

During the 15-minute call, Gray is heard to say: 'Listen to me now. My daughter's not breathing properly, she's collapsed, she's not moving and I have to get an ambulance.'

After the operator asks if she is breathing, Gray responds: 'She's not breathing, she's trying to breathe. What do I do now?'

Butler can be heard to say: 'I just come upstairs, my little girl has fallen down...and she's laying there, she's always falling.'

As the operator gives instructions, Butler shouts: 'What happened? Tell me.. What happened? What happened?' 

Gray is then instructed to give her daughter CPR with breaths followed by 30 chest compressions.

Paramedic Sarah Hardy, pictured, who was first on the scene to treat Ellie, said she called the police after noticing a 'boggy mass' on the back of the girl's head

Paramedic Sarah Hardy, pictured, who was first on the scene to treat Ellie, said she called the police after noticing a 'boggy mass' on the back of the girl's head

As the call was played, Gray broke down in tears in the dock. 

Butler, who police found had sent hundreds of abusive text messages to his partner, sighed, looked at the floor and at one point reached across the dock to take Gray's hand.

Much of the call was inaudible with screaming and shouting as the operator repeatedly tells the couple to 'calm down'.  

First responder Sarah Hardy told the court that Ellie was 'very cold and blue' when she arrived.

THE HARROWING 999 CALL 

Much of the 15-minute 999 call played to the jury was inaudible, but Gray is heard desperately pleading for help while Butler talks in the background.

The call goes as follows:

Butler: 'This is serious. She's not breathing.'

Operator: 'Stop shouting. I can't understand what's going on.'

Gray: 'Listen to me now. My daughter's not breathing properly, she's collapsed, she's not moving and I have to get an ambulance. Can you tell me what to do please?

'She's not breathing, she's trying to breathe. What do I do now?' 

Butler: 'I just come upstairs, my little girl has fallen down...and she's laying there, she's always falling. 

'What happened? Tell me.. What happened? What happened?'

Butler later snaps and shouts at the operator after being asked repeatedly to provide their address.

He said: What's wrong with you. We have told you to f******...'

The recording then becomes inaudible due to the volume of shouting.  

She found the little girl in her pyjamas, lying on the floor of her bedroom, as her mother carried out CPR.

The medic said Ellie had no heartbeat to shock.

She said: 'I asked mum and dad what had happened. Father replied he had seen something like foam coming out of her mouth and does that mean she might be all right.

'I asked again what had happened to her and I believe her dad said 'I don't know. I thought she was in her bedroom sleeping'.

'I heard someone say her mum had come home from work and had called up to Ellie she had brought cupcakes home.'

Of Gray's behaviour at the time, she said: 'She was crying and saying something along the lines of 'Please come back so we can have cupcakes again together'.'

More medics arrived and they continued to try to save Ellie but there was no change in her condition.

Ms Hardy told jurors she could not understand how Ellie could have died until she noticed a 'boggy mass' on the back of her head.

She said: 'Since I felt the boggy mass I realised the cause of death was a traumatic cardiac arrest.

'As soon as I discovered the boggy mass I put a call into St George's (hospital). I had concerns as to how this had happened and called police.'

She also noticed a red liquid coming from her nose or mouth filling up the little girl's face mask. 

Ambulance crew member Penny Robson told jurors of her 'devastation' at finding a boggy mass while repositioning Ellie's head.

She said: 'It was completely soft. I was kind of devastated because it is the first time I have ever ever felt that. The whole area was soft. I did not feel any hard area at all.'

She went on to describe seeing fluid that 'looked like tomato soup' coming from the child's mouth or nose.

Butler, right, denies murder at the trial at the Old Bailey while he and Gray, left, also deny child cruelty

Butler, right, denies murder at the trial at the Old Bailey while he and Gray, left, also deny child cruelty

A court sketch of Gray, left, and Butler, right, in the dock at the Old Bailey during the trial

A court sketch of Gray, left, and Butler, right, in the dock at the Old Bailey during the trial

She said: 'It was an orangey red. I had not ever seen that colour fluid before - blood doesn't look like that when it comes out.'

The witness, who took over basic life support from Ms Hardy, told jurors that Butler appeared 'hysterical'.  

When more help turned up, Neil Fisher then tried to find out from the mother how Ellie had been hurt.

Mr Fisher told jurors that it was 'very unusual' to find a child in cardiac arrest, and he asked Gray what had happened.

He said: 'She replied she had been at work and she had come home early, brought cakes home, that she had cut the cake in the kitchen and called up to Ellie a few times.'

Cross-examining, Bernard Tetlow QC for Gray queried if Ms Hardy had really heard the mother talking about having cupcakes again with Ellie.

But the witness replied: 'I remember her saying it because it made me choke a bit. I felt sorry for her.'

The 'urgent' 999 call was apparently made just moments after they had discovered their daughter's lifeless body on the bedroom floor of their family home in Sutton, south London.

Paramedics arrived minutes after to find Ellie lying on her back next to an overturned stool, with injuries more commonly associated with car crash victims.

But the jury had been told earlier how the phone call was made more than two hours after Ellie suffered 'catastrophic head injuries' that were commonly seen in 'car-crash victims'.

The prosecution say both parents already knew their daughter's fate and had spent those hours plotting a 'carefully coordinated and elaborate' cover-up to make it look as though Ellie had died in a tragic accident. 

Father 'walked Jack Russell puppy and talked to neighbours about the weather after killing his six-year-old daughter' 

Earlier, the court had heard evidence from two neighbours, including Elaine Winson, who said she saw Butler outside the family home with his Jack Russell puppy just 15 minutes before the 999 call was made. 

He commented on the weather saying 'Isn't it nasty', which she thought was odd.

Ms Winson told jurors: 'The fact he made a comment to me I thought was strange because I had never spoken to him before.'

Later, Ms Winson described seeing Butler's blank expression as Ellie was taken to an ambulance outside.

Forensic officers are pictured outside the family home after paramedics found Ellie dead at the property 

Forensic officers are pictured outside the family home after paramedics found Ellie dead at the property 

A police officer is pictured standing outside the family home following Ellie's death in October 2013

A police officer is pictured standing outside the family home following Ellie's death in October 2013

She said: 'As they were bringing the little girl out on a trolley paramedics were working on her giving CPR.

'The mother was severely distressed and holding on to the trolley.

'The father was behind. He had no expression on his face. There was nothing.

'At the time I thought it was shock over what was happening.'

Marion Cook was on good neighbourly terms with the Butler family and looked after their puppy after Ellie was taken to hospital.

When Gray came to collect the dog a couple of days later, she 'broke down in tears', she said.

Ms Cook said that Gray had told her Ellie 'fell off her bed and hit her head on a radiator'.

Pictured: Moment mother is seen 'rushing home from work to help her partner cover up the murder of their six-year-old daughter who had injures like a car crash victim' 

This is the moment Ellie Butler's panicking mother hailed a cab home after her husband allegedly told her he had murdered their daughter.

In CCTV footage from October 2013, Jennie Gray can be seen running from her central London office desperate to get a taxi back to her family address in Sutton, 12 miles away.

Dressed all in black, she was picked up by Derek Greenwood outside her offices.

Mr Greenwood described the 36-year-old as being 'desperate to get a cab', adding that she told him: 'Can you take me? My child's really ill.'

He then claimed to have heard Gray making frantic phone calls to her abusive partner Ben Butler as she rushed home from work. 

This is the moment Ellie Butler's panicking mother hailed a cab home after her partner allegedly told her he had murdered their daughter

This is the moment Ellie Butler's panicking mother hailed a cab home after her partner allegedly told her he had murdered their daughter

The prosecution say Gray - who had raced out of work shortly before - was talking to her partner Ben Butler, also 36, who had phoned her minutes before to tell him that he had killed their little girl, Ellie.

The jury was told how, after arriving home an hour later, Gray spent another 60 minutes helping Butler stage a scene in Ellie's bedroom to make it appear as though the youngster had died in a tragic fall. 

Mr Greenwood told the court: 'I heard her say: 'You've gone where? You've done what?'

'I remember this as I was waiting for her to tell me a new destination.'

He said: 'She seemed keen and desperate to get a cab.

'She asked me how much to go to Sutton. I said to her I didn't know. I was just trying to refuse the job because it was all the way to Sutton.'

In CCTV footage from October 2013 shows Jennie Gray running from her central London office desperate to get a taxi back to her family address in Sutton, 12 miles away

In CCTV footage from October 2013 shows Jennie Gray running from her central London office desperate to get a taxi back to her family address in Sutton, 12 miles away

Mr Greenwood said Gray ended up paying him just under £50 for the journey. He said it was only the next day, when he heard on the news that a child had died, that he thought the fare might be significant. 

The jury were also shown CCTV footage of Gray's desperate dash home amid a flurry of phone calls and texts with Butler.

The court was told Butler first tried to call at 12.46pm but was diverted to voicemail. Seconds later, he texted 'answer'.

Telephone records show she called him back immediately and they spoke for 21 seconds.

Two minutes later, Gray was caught on camera hurrying out of her office at 20 Old Bailey, before dashing across the street running past the court - where she is now standing trial - to hail down the taxi.

In a statement read to the court, Tracey Bernstein, a colleague who worked alongside Gray at Octopus Investment, described the moment the graphic designer left work.

'The way she got up just wasn't right,' Ms Bernstein said. 'My gut feeling was she was walking out of the job and not coming back.' 

Bullying stay-at-home father accused of beating six-year-old daughter to death then forcing girlfriend to help cover-up 'was convicted then cleared of injuring the girl when she was a baby' 

Bullying stay-at-home father Ben Butler allegedly killed his daughter less than a year after she was returned to her family home when his conviction for assaulting her was quashed, the jury was told today.

Ellie was put into foster care in 2007 after her father was found guilty of causing her serious injuries when she was a baby.

But when his conviction was quashed in 2010, Butler and his besotted partner launched a successful custody bid in the High Court.

Gray and Butler even appeared on ITV's This Morning after his conviction for assaulting his then-baby daughter Ellie was overturned by the Court of Appeal

Gray and Butler even appeared on ITV's This Morning after his conviction for assaulting his then-baby daughter Ellie was overturned by the Court of Appeal

Just 11 months after being returned to the 'toxic' family home, the little girl was found dead on her bedroom floor with injuries usually associated with car crash victims.   

Ed Brown QC, prosecuting, told the jury: 'In 2007, when she was six weeks old, she was taken to hospital with serious head injuries.

'Ben Butler was charged with assaulting her and causing those injuries. Ben Butler was tried and convicted by the jury. However, he appealed and his conviction was quashed by the Court of Appeal on June 17, 2010.

'By then Ellie had been fostered and proceedings were commenced in the High Court by Ben Butler and Jennie Gray for the return of Ellie to their care. Those proceedings were successful.

'In November 2012 Ellie was returned to the care of Ben Butler and Jennie Gray.'

He added: 'Whether and, if so, the extent to which this is of true relevance to the issues in the case will be for you to judge during the evidence.' 

AGGRESSIVE TEXT MESSAGES WHICH REVEAL 'TORRENT OF VERBAL ABUSE' WHICH ALLEGED KILLER UNLEASHED ON HIS SUBSERVIENT PARTNER

Text messages read out in court revealed the 'torrent of verbal abuse' which Ben Butler regularly unleashed on his subservient partner, including called her a 'dog w****, 'fat loser' and an 'ugly b****'.

Butler, 35, repeatedly sent angry messages to his partner Jennie Gray, threatening violence, criticising her comments and even once saying: 'Stay out of my way'.  

The exchange of messages also showed Butler's 'expressions of hatred towards Ellie' and how 'her very existence in his life caused frustration and anger in him'.

In one message on 18 July, he told her: 'Take Ellie walk streets u ain't coming here..il maim u b****.'

Two minutes later he said: 'if u dont do wot I want im bashing u.' In other texts, Butler says he 'can't cope', is 'in a rage' or 'ready to flip'.

Reading the messages to the jury, prosecutor Ed Brown said Gray responded by trying to appease him, telling Butler: 'I luv U and want U.' Another sent in August said: 'Just so U know - I am obsessed and in awe of U!

In a later text, she wrote: 'I would die for U x'. 

But the court was told how besotted Gray also wrote letters begging for Butler to stop his behaviour. 

She even carried out Google searches such as 'magic spell to make him love me again' and 'magic spell to stop his hate', the court was told. 

Police also found a hand-written letter of prayer by Gray, which read: 'Please make Ben Butler come back to me in love and like and want to be a family; Please make my home and... Ellie and Ben and I all happy together as a family; Please don't let Ben leave me, but make him learn to like me, stop violence and make him WANT ME.'   

Gray's diary entries, found torn up in the communal bins following Ellie's death, were also read out to jurors.

One said: 'Ben put porn on and asked me to do stuff but weren't clear then kneed me in t*** and p**** etc. and kicked me out. Ben kicked me out then let me back in (was raining).' 

Also found was a video, possibly accidently recorded on a Samsung camera. The brief clip was filmed while Butler was in the kitchen with Ellie as he is speaking on the phone.

He shouts: 'Don't you ask me to do something which you ain't f****** done - now f*** off!' 

The prosecutor said Ellie's behaviour was also a concern.

Internet searches on a laptop used by Gray showed searches for 'six year old urinating to be bad' and 'six year old hears a voice in her head'.

A hand-written note entitled 'Ellie's behaviour' listed points including 'feel you can't trust her' and 'we feel like she is aware she is doing this'.

Mr Brown said: 'Thus it is not a simple story of purely abusive behaviour but rather a more complex story in which the abuse and anger boiled over with terrible consequences and in which each parent failed to act in the way that their clear responsibilities should have dictated.'

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Adam Johnson’s sister Faye CONGRATULATES Ched Evans on appeal

  • Faye Johnson took to social media to applaud the quashed conviction
  • Former footballer Ched Evans was convicted of raping 19-year-old in 2012
  • After serving prison term he has denied his guilt and mounted an appeal
  • Three senior judges quashed conviction as 'unsafe' and ordered re-trial 
  • Evans thanked his girlfriend for her 'unconditional love, belief and support'

By Richard Spillett and Emma Glanfield for MailOnline

Published: 03:17 GMT, 22 April 2016 | Updated: 03:52 GMT, 22 April 2016

The sister of disgraced footballer Adam Johnson congratulated Ched Evans over his quashed rape conviction calling the Court of Appeal decision 'great news' and offering him good luck for his re-trial.

Faye Johnson, whose brother was jailed for six years last month for sexually touching a 15-year-old, reached out to Evans after his conviction for raping a 19-year-old woman was quashed yesterday.

Former Sheffield United striker Evans, 27, who was found guilty in 2012 of raping the woman at a hotel in Rhyl, North Wales, now faces a re-trial - for which the case will be sent back to Crown Court.

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Ex-footballer Ched Evans, 27, emerges from London's appeal court yesterday after having his rape conviction quashed
Faye Johnson (pictured), the sister of fellow former disgraced footballer Adam Johnson, congratulated Evans on the Court of Appeal decision with a clapping hand emoji and called it 'great news'

Ex-footballer Ched Evans, 27, emerges from London's appeal court yesterday (left) after having his rape conviction quashed. Faye Johnson (right), the sister of fellow former disgraced footballer Adam Johnson, congratulated Evans on the Court of Appeal decision with a clapping hand emoji and called it 'great news'

Evans later released a statement thanking Ms Massey for her 'unconditional love, belief and support'

Evans later released a statement thanking Ms Massey for her 'unconditional love, belief and support'

The decision seems to have given hope to the family of Adam Johnson, who is also wants to appeal. His sister Faye posted a hand clapping emoji at the quashed conviction while his Facebook page called it 'great news'

The decision seems to have given hope to the family of Adam Johnson, who is also wants to appeal. His sister Faye posted a hand clapping emoji at the quashed conviction while his Facebook page called it 'great news'

Ms Johnson applauded the re-trial decision yesterday - which was ordered by Lady Justice Hallett, one of the country's most senior women judges – by posting a tweet with a hands clapping emoji.

The 'Adam Johnson's Appeal Fight' page on Facebook, believed to be supported by Miss Johnson, also posted the message: 'Great news on Ched Evans winning his appeal. Let's hope he gets justice this time! Good luck to you and your family x'

It is believed the family have taken hope from Evans' situation since Johnson - who is currently serving a six-year jail-term - also plans to appeal his sentence, which his lawyers claim is 'excessive'.

After successfully winning his appeal, Evans released a statement thanking his girlfriend Natasha Massey for her 'unconditional love, belief and support'.

His statement said: 'We all welcome today's decision by the Court of Appeal... however, there are no winners and no celebration.

'Ched would like to place on record his thanks to the judiciary for carrying out a detailed process, repaying his faith in the legal system.'

A shorter version of the statement was later posted stressing that 'the legal process has not reached a final conclusion'. 

Former Sheffield United striker Evans, 27, who was found guilty in 2012 of raping the woman at a hotel in Rhyl, North Wales, now faces a re-trial. He is pictured outside court with girlfriend Natasha Massey yesterday

Former Sheffield United striker Evans, 27, who was found guilty in 2012 of raping the woman at a hotel in Rhyl, North Wales, now faces a re-trial. He is pictured outside court with girlfriend Natasha Massey yesterday

Evans' girlfriend Miss Massey entered the court alone this morning. Evans was in court with his family
Evans' girlfriend Miss Massey entered the court alone this morning. Evans was in court with his family

Evans' girlfriend Miss Massey entered the court alone yesterday morning. Evans was in court with his family

Lady Justice Hallett announced Evans' conviction was quashed at London's Court of Appeal yesterday

Lady Justice Hallett announced Evans' conviction was quashed at London's Court of Appeal yesterday

'THERE ARE NO WINNERS': FULL STATEMENT BY CHED EVANS

A statement released on Evans' website reads: 'We all welcome today's decision by the Court of Appeal.

'Ched would like to thank all of his family, friends, legal team and football supporters from around the country especially those of Sheffield United for their support, encouragement and belief.

'Today's decision and the whole process could not have been possible without the unconditional love, belief and support of Natasha and both families. However, there are no winners and no celebration.

'Finally, Ched would like to place on record his thanks to the judiciary for carrying out a detailed process, repaying his faith in the legal system.

'No further statements will be made, but we would respectfully request that Ched, Natasha, their families and others affected are now given time and space to start rebuilding their lives.'

The statement was later replaced with a shorter version which stressed 'the legal process has not reached a final conclusion'.

His statement came after Lady Justice Hallett said she and her fellow judges had heard 'fresh evidence' during the appeal hearing on March 22 and 23.

She said: '[Evans] appealed to this court against conviction... on the basis that relevant and admissible evidence has come to light, that was not available at trial, and that undermines the safety of his conviction.' 

The judge added: 'In summary, we have concluded that we must allow the appeal and that it is in the interests of justice to order a retrial,' she continued.

The court quashed Evans's conviction and declared: 'The appellant will be retried on the allegation of rape.'

Evans was granted bail while his new trial is arranged.

The former Sheffield United player has always denied his guilt. He was released from prison two years ago after serving half of his five-year sentence.

The ex-Welsh international was present in the packed London courtroom with his girlfriend by his side to hear the result of his conviction challenge today.

Around 20 members of the 27-year-old's family were also in court to hear the ruling by the three appeal judges.

None of the group celebrated after the judges ruling was delivered and they all remained quiet.

At his trial, Evans insisted that he had consensual sex with the woman after a night out. 

The prosecution said the woman, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was too drunk to consent to sexual intercourse. 

Evans and Miss Massey returned home to their house in Cheshire this afternoon following the hearing
Evans and Miss Massey returned home to their house in Cheshire this afternoon following the hearing

Evans and Miss Massey returned home to their house in Cheshire yesterday afternoon following the hearing

The couple were later seen heading out as Evans again prepares to face a Crown Court trial over the incident

The couple were later seen heading out as Evans again prepares to face a Crown Court trial over the incident

COULD EVANS'S QUASHED CONVICTION PAVE THE WAY FOR HIM TO RETURN TO THE PITCH?

Evans's career was effectively ended by his conviction, after a string of clubs refused to sign him following protests by fans.

His fans will now hope the fact that he is awaiting trial - rather than a convicted sex attacker - could see him return to the pitch.

League One Oldham Athletic were previously said to be keen on signing the Wales international but the deal was called off after pressure from sponsors and alleged death threats to board members.

His licence conditions, which continue until next year, also forbid him from working abroad and scuppered a potential move to a Maltese club last year.

Sources close to the player said today that he is concentrating on his family life and has not thought about playing football.

His conviction was referred to the Court of Appeal for review by the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC), which investigates possible miscarriages of justice. 

Earlier this year, senior judges Lady Justice Hallett, Mr Justice Flaux and Sir David Maddison previously heard submissions from Evans' lawyers and the Crown over two days.

Evans' girlfriend Natasha Massey has stood by him and accompanied him to the appeal court hearing last month. The couple now have a child together. 

At Evans' trial, Port Vale defender Clayton McDonald, 23, who also admitted having sex with the victim, was found not guilty of the same charge.

The woman who was allegedly raped by Evans has been repeatedly targeted by social media trolls who have breached her legal right to anonymity.

Lady Justice Hallett made clear yesterday that: 'The identity of the complainant in this case must not be reported.'

Evans, a former Sheffield United player, has been unable to find a new team since his release from prison - but those working with him may seek to convince a club to sign him following the decision. 

Evans' lawyer said he is 'extremely grateful that the Court of Appeal has ruled that his conviction was unsafe'

Evans' lawyer said he is 'extremely grateful that the Court of Appeal has ruled that his conviction was unsafe'

TIMELINE OF THE FOOTBALLER'S RAPE CASE: HOW HE CAME BEFORE COURT

May 30, 2011 - Evans, then a Sheffield United striker, is arrested on suspicion of sexual assault at a Premier Inn near Rhyl, north Wales.

April 20, 2012 - He is convicted of raping a 19-year-old woman and sentenced to five years in prison following a trial at Caernarfon Crown Court.

May 30, 2012 - Evans is released by Sheffield United at the end of the football season.

November 6, 2012 - The Court of Appeal refuses him leave to appeal his conviction or reduce the length of his sentence.

October 17, 2014 - Evans is released from prison after serving half of his sentence.

Evans, pictured after his initial arrest
Evans, pictured during his days playing for Sheffield United

Evans, pictured (left) after his initial arrest and (right) during his days playing for Sheffield United

November 11, 2014 - Sheffield United faces a public backlash after saying it would let him train with them, an offer it later withdrew. TV presenter and club patron Charlie Webster quits and Olympic champion Jessica Ennis-Hill demands her name be taken off the Bramall Lane stand in protest.

October 5, 2015 - Evans's case is referred to the Court of Appeal by the Criminal Case Review Commission on the basis of new information after a 10-month investigation.

March 22, 2016 - The appeal hearing is held at the High Court in London.

April 21, 2016 - Evans wins appeal against conviction and is granted unconditional bail. Court of Appeal orders a fresh indictment 'must be served' and that 'the appellant must be re-arraigned on that fresh indictment within two months of today'. The venue of the retrial, the trial judge and the date of the retrial 'will be determined by the Senior Presiding Judge for the Wales Circuit', Mrs Justice Nicola Davies.

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Sir David Attenborough’s first wildlife show Zoo Quest to be screened in colour

  • Nature documentary Zoo Quest first shown on the BBC in December 1954 
  • Sir David Attenborough thought the footage was filmed in black and white 
  • Series was broadcast 10 years before colour television was seen in the UK 

By Ben Tufft For Mailonline

Published: 17:28 GMT, 20 April 2016 | Updated: 17:41 GMT, 20 April 2016

Sir David Attenborough's first nature documentary, originally aired in black and white, is to be shown in colour to mark his 90th birthday.

Zoo Quest ran for seven series between 1954 and 1963 and was thought to have been filmed in the original mode of transmission.

The naturalist was stunned to discover that - after the footage had been unearthed from BBC vaults last year - the series was in fact shot in colour.

Sir David Attenborough's first nature documentary aired in black and white. The broadcaster is pictured with Benjamin, a Malaysian sun bear
Sir David pictured with Jane the chimp, who became a favourite with viewers

Sir David Attenborough's first nature documentary aired in black and white. The broadcaster is pictured with Benjamin, a Malaysian sun bear (left) and Jane the chimp, who became a favourite with viewers

Zoo Quest ran for seven series between 1954 and 1963. The naturalist was stunned to discover that - after the footage had been unearthed from BBC vaults last year - the series was shot in colour

Zoo Quest ran for seven series between 1954 and 1963. The naturalist was stunned to discover that - after the footage had been unearthed from BBC vaults last year - the series was shot in colour

'I was astonished when someone said we've got nearly all the film of the first three expeditions you did in colour,' Sir David said.

'I said, "It's impossible, we shot in black and white",' he added. 

Zoo Quest In Colour will be screened on BBC Four in May as part of a week of programming across the BBC to mark the veteran naturalist's milestone birthday on May 8.

First broadcast in December 1954, Zoo Quest was one of the most popular television series of its time and launched the career of the young David Attenborough as a wildlife presenter.

The series was broadcast 10 years before colour television was seen in the UK.

Zoo Quest In Colour will be screened on BBC Four in May to mark the veteran naturalist's milestone birthday

Zoo Quest In Colour will be screened on BBC Four in May to mark the veteran naturalist's milestone birthday

The series was broadcast 10 years before colour television was seen in the UK and made a star of Sir David

The series was broadcast 10 years before colour television was seen in the UK and made a star of Sir David

Zoo Quest was one of the most popular television series of its time and launched the career of the young David Attenborough (pictured)
Sir David Attenborough will be the focus of a number of programmes on the BBC to mark his 90th birthday

Zoo Quest was one of the most popular television series of its time and launched the career of the young David Attenborough (left) 

Using the newly-discovered colour 16mm film, together with behind the scenes stories from Sir David and cameraman Charles Lagus, the special will showcase the best of Zoo Quest To West Africa, Zoo Quest To Guiana and Zoo Quest For A Dragon in HD colour.

Mr Lagus said: 'At its best it's as good as any colour you see now, quite staggering for the period that it was filmed in. I was astonished.'

Other programmes to be screened as part of the week include Attenborough At 90 on BBC One, which will see presenter Kirsty Young talking to the broadcaster about his career and some of his animal encounters across the world.

BBC Two will also screen Life That Glows, in which Sir David looks at creatures such as glow worms, fire flies and luminous plankton to guide viewers through the world of bioluminescence.

Sir David said: 'I was astonished when someone said we've got nearly all the film of the first three expeditions you did in colour'

Sir David said: 'I was astonished when someone said we've got nearly all the film of the first three expeditions you did in colour'

Using the newly-discovered colour 16mm film, together with behind the scenes stories from Sir David and cameraman Charles Lagus, (right) the new show will bring together the best of the naturalist's programmes

Using the newly-discovered colour 16mm film, together with behind the scenes stories from Sir David and cameraman Charles Lagus, (right) the new show will bring together the best of the naturalist's programmes

Sir David is now the preeminent nature broadcaster in the world and his programmes are screened worldwide

Sir David is now the preeminent nature broadcaster in the world and his programmes are screened worldwide

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